Hair Loss Hoaxes


Wasting Money Doesn't Grow Hair

Despite a $1billion per year industry’s attempts to make it more complicated and thus more lucrative, mastering the subject of hair loss does not require degrees in chemistry, biology, pharmacology or even cosmetology. It only requires you to be focused on the end result – growing hair – without getting sidetracked by medical minutiae or conned by those who exploit your desires.

scalp massagers don't work

Want to promote hair growth? Use over-the-counter minoxidil (Rogaine) or get a prescription for finasteride (Propecia). Despite a myriad of other choices, those are your only two effective choices. Even then, positive results are limited to some people in certain circumstances. Still, anything else is unproven and unreliable, a waste of time and money.

Ineffective alternatives include:
  • Any other substance you rub into your hair or scalp
  • Anything you swallow
  • Anything you wear on your head
  • Anything related to massage, vibration, electricity or radioactivity
  • Anything besides minoxidil or finasteride.

Of course, just saying something doesn’t make it true. Calling something a hoax is merely a claim which can be disproven by evidence. And where is that evidence? Anything that worked would be used by millions of people and the results would be self-evident: it would grow hair.

Here is what is not evidence:
  • Unsubstantiated claims
  • Testimonials
  • Testing that does not use double blinds and that does not account for the placebo effect
  • Widespread usage
  • Extensive advertising
  • Failure by the government to stop a product’s sale.

According to the
Minoxidil, a well-known internet address for hair growth products, most hoaxes fall into several categories that appeal to a balding person’s need to feel hopeful.

Scalp cleansers appear useful because of anecdotal evidence that clogged hair follicles prevent hair growth. Marketing shows photos and illustrations of follicles so clogged with oils and foreign matter that any growth at all would seem impossible. And if you use such cleansers, you do receive an immediate benefit – clean hair that appears fuller and healthier than before. Unfortunately, follicles that refused to sprout hair before the cleanser remain barren after a good washing.

Another category of products that, on the surface, appear to make sense are
nutritional supplements. If, as Grace Slick advised, you feed your head properly, only the most sadistic hair follicle would refuse to burst with new life. Substances in which you are woefully deficient include B vitamins, Vitmain E, zinc, omega 3, and saw palmetto. Yet, even a regular intake of these elements, however helpful they are to your overall health, do not promote new hair growth.

Scalp exciters are another group of products that, if there were any justice in this world, should work. Massaging your tired scalp feels so good. Couldn’t it repay that kindness with a few new sprouts? High tech treatments, such as low-level lasers and electromagnetics offer an ingenuous combination of both magic and science. But when it comes to measuring results, the output is disappointing

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-- Tom Waits

Minoxidil works

Want to try something that is proven to grow hair for some people? Minoxidil is available without a prescription from Minoxidil While a few people may have risk factors that would prevent them from using minoxidil (see Minoxidil, most have found the drug to be a safe and useful way to encourage hair growth.

Minoxidil also offers the guarantee of absolute privacy when you order minoxidil. Visit Minoxidil right now.